Webinar Programs

SELECT ID, title, date_available FROM seminar WHERE provider_id='396' AND date_available <= '20160531' AND invitationonly=0 AND (expiration_date > NOW() OR expiration_date < '2000-1-1')ORDER BY date_available DESC
Upcoming Live Webcasts
Collapse Webinar on InAs/GaSb Mid-Wave Cascaded Superlattice Light Emitting Diodes

 

In this webinar hosted by the OSA Laser Systems Technical Group, Dr. John Prineas from the University of Iowa will present an overview of his research on InAs/GaSb mid-wave, cascaded superlattice light emitting diodes.

 

InAs/GaSb mid-wave, cascaded superlattice light emitting diodes (SLEDs) have been heavily developed for high power infrared emitter arrays such technologies as thermal scene generation. They started life as a promising material for infrared focal plane arrays for thermal imaging due to the possibility of Auger suppression, which limits narrow gap semiconductor performance, through bandstructure engineering. SLEDs have been demonstrated with cascading, multi-spectral output, on foreign substrates with no degradation in output power, and in arrays of increasing dimensions.  Arrays with apparent temperatures hotter than the surface of the sun are envisioned.

 

What You Will Learn/Seminar Objectives:

  • Attendees will learn about the ongoing development of a promising new infrared optoelectronic technology and about radiative and nonradiative carrier dynamical processes in narrow gap semiconductors.
  • Attendees will learn about SLEDs technology, emitter array technology, and thermal scene generation.

 

Who Should Attend:

  • Academia
  • Government and industry researchers
  • Engineers and scientists developing mid-infrared light sources

 

Level:

  • This webinar will be at an intermediate level.
Formats Available: Live Webcast
Original Seminar Date: May 31, 2016
On-Demand Release Date: June 01, 2016
MORE INFOMORE INFO Webinar on InAs/GaSb Mid-Wave Cascaded Superlattice Light Emitting Diodes
Collapse Optical Trapping and Manipulation of a Single Human Virus

 

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the invention of optical tweezers by Ashkin and co-workers. Although Ashkin and Dziedzic first demonstrated optical trapping of individual tobacco mosaic viruses in solution as early as 1987, this pioneering work has not been followed up only until recently. Using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a model virus, Dr. Wei Cheng from the University of Michigan has recently demonstrated that a single HIV-1 virion can be stabled trapped, manipulated and measured in physiological media with high precision. Join the OSA Optical Trapping and Manipulation in Molecular and Cellular Biology Technical Group for this live webinar with Dr. Cheng as he presents the first demonstration for optical trapping of a single animal virus. 

 

The capability to optically trap a single virion in solution offers new research opportunities. First, by examining the stiffness of an optical trap as a function of the trapped virion size, we can determine the refractive index of a single virus with high precision, which offers a label-free parameter that may be useful for characterization of these particles in solution. To the best of our knowledge, this is also the first experimental measurement of the refractive index for a single virus particle. Second, using the simultaneous two-photon fluorescence excitation coincident with optical trapping, we show that optical trapping of a single virion allows one to quantitate the heterogeneity among individual particles with single-molecule resolution. We have used this technique to study individual HIV virions and the results bear implications on mechanisms of HIV-1 infection.  Lastly, the capability to physically capture a single virion in solution allows us to deliver individual virions to a single cell, which may be useful for the study of virion-cell interactions.

 

What You Will Learn/Seminar Objectives:

  • The webinar will focus on a very interesting emerging area of optical trapping and micromanipulation, namely the direct manipulation and characterisation of single viruses.
  • The webinar will provide an understanding of the type of insights gained from performing optical force measurements on single trapped viruses and also how these measurements can be combined with complementary microscopy techniques to probe cell-virus interactions.

 

Who Should Attend:

  • The webinar will be of interest to individuals and researchers working in the field of optical trapping 
  • The webinar will also be of interest to researchers in affiliated areas working in optical microscopy and biosensing.

 

Level:

  • This talk will be pitched at a graduate level audience and the technical content will be at a level one would normally expect from an invited talk at an OSA biomedical optics conference.
Formats Available: Live Webcast
Original Seminar Date: June 16, 2016
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
MORE INFOMORE INFO Optical Trapping and Manipulation of a Single Human Virus
On-Demand Programs Date Available
Optical Trapping and Manipulation of a Single Human Virus May 24, 2016
Applied Laser Spark Spectroscopy: The Evolution of LIBS into Real-World Applications May 18, 2016
Losses in plasmonics: strategies to bypass, mitigate or - if nothing else works - embrace them May 10, 2016
Semiconductor Quantum Technologies for Information Processing and Sensing Apr 28, 2016
Introducing the OSA Display Technology Technical Group Mar 28, 2016
Export Control Reform Proposed Rule Updates Mar 09, 2016
What Can We Learn From High-Resolution Retinal Imaging? Mar 08, 2016
The Next Generation of Coherent Optical Mar 03, 2016
Molecular Spectroscopy with Optical Frequency Combs Feb 16, 2016
Novel Optical Sensors Based on Nonlinear Effects in Few-Mode Fibers Feb 02, 2016
Exploring Recent Advances in NLO Materials Jan 27, 2016
Exploring Recent Advances in OLED Materials and Displays Nov 23, 2015
Leveraging Apps, Social Media and Your Digital Reputation for Professional Success Nov 12, 2015
2D Material Nanophotonics for Optical Information Science Sep 29, 2015
Optical Image Quality Metrics & Quantitative Modeling of Comb Sources Jul 06, 2015
Silicon Electronic Photonic Integrated Circuits (SiEPIC) Research Training Jun 23, 2015
Practical Nanophotonics with Plasmonic Ceramics Jun 16, 2015
Nanophotonics in the Year of Light Mar 04, 2015
Adaptive Optics: Latest Results in Vision Science, Microscopy and Astronomy Feb 18, 2015
A Year in Visual Optics: Understanding the Anterior Human Eye Dec 17, 2014
Light on a Chip: The Future of Photonic Integration Dec 15, 2014
Rare-earth doped amplifiers integration onto nanophotonics platforms Dec 10, 2014
Integrated Photonics Institute for Manufacturing Innovation Q & A Nov 26, 2014
Understanding Cloud Services, Market & Technology Oct 29, 2014
The Freedom of Freeforms: Current Optics Manufacturing Methods Allow for Freeform Optical Designs Oct 17, 2014
Polarization Related Emulation and Testing in Coherent Optical Communication Systems Sep 04, 2014
Visualizing Catalytic Reactions and Light-Matter Interactions with Nanometer-Scale Resolution Jul 23, 2014
National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) Background Information & Information on DOD RFI Jun 18, 2014
Department of Energy's SBIR/STTR Program Overview Jun 04, 2014
Carrier SDN for Multi-layer Control: Savings and Services May 08, 2014
Surface Slope Tolerances Nov 15, 2013
Ultrabroadband Optical Parametric Amplifiers: Towards Single-Cycle CEP-Controlled Pulses Nov 12, 2013
A look into the world of Nonimaging Optics Jul 11, 2013
Rugged Micro-Optic Packaging for Extreme Environments Jan 17, 2013
What's Wrong with My Image? Nov 29, 2012
Coherent Super-Channels Nov 07, 2012
Optical Design in the Infrared: The World has Changed - New Materials, Methods, and Solutions to Address New Challenges Dec 23, 2011
Introduction to Optical Glasses: Characteristics, Applications and Customizations Sep 20, 2011